PreSonus Introduces Quantum 2626 Audio Interface

PreSonus has debuted the Quantum 2626 audio interface using a Thunderbolt 3 bus to achieve a barely measurable roundtrip latency (as low as <1 ms).

PreSonus said the new model can record and monitor with up to 24-bit, 192 kHz fidelity through favored plug-ins, without leaving the DAW. High-quality converters on every analog input and output provide 115 dB of dynamic range to capture complex musical harmonics smoothly and naturally with no audible distortion.

The Quantum 2626 provides up to 26 inputs and 26 outputs, with eight of PreSonus’ XMAX Class A analog microphone preamps, two instrument inputs to directly connect basses and guitars, and six balanced line level inputs. The first two inputs are equipped with direct outputs and dedicated returns to patch in favored outboard gear. An additional 18 inputs and outputs are available via ADAT/dual SMUX and S/PDIF.

Users also get eight ¼-inch TRS outputs that are DC coupled for sending control voltages, plus two balanced Main outputs, two high-volume headphone outs with dedicated volume controls and MIDI I/O.

Rear panel.

Rear panel.

A BNC word clock I/O ensures the Quantum 2626 and other digital audio devices operate in tight sync. The interface is well protected by a 1U rack-mountable, rugged, all-metal chassis with metal knobs.

With the included Studio One Artist DAW, the Quantum 2626 is a complete recording solution. The interface also is compatible with any recording software that supports Core Audio (macOS) or ASIO (Windows).

Free PreSonus UC Surface control software for Mac and Windows provides access to full metering, including metering for connected PreSonus DP88 eight-channel A/DA preamp/converters, as well as UC Surface’s integrated Real-Time Analyzer (RTA).

The Quantum 2626 is available now.

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