Sadler’s Wells Theatre In London Selects Riedel’s Bolero Wireless Intercom

Sadler’s Wells Theatre in London is one of the world’s leading dance venues, staging contemporary dance and ballet performances in its 1,560-seat main auditorium. It recently installed a Bolero wireless intercom system from Riedel Communications to ensure reliable and flexible communications across the 10,000-square-meter building and the adjacent Lilian Baylis Studio.

As well as providing a stage for visiting companies, the Sadler's Wells Theatre is a producing house with a number of associated artists and companies creating original works for the theater, and many locally produced shows are also recorded for cinema. Visiting OB trucks that are also equipped with Riedel Artist systems can easily interface with the theatre's systems, creating smoothly integrated workflows and tremendous convenience.

Bolero covers the spacious theatre with only four antennas. One is located at the side of the stage, with another in the auditorium and the third on the fly floor, which also covers all the dressing room corridors and backstage studios. The fourth antenna uses the IT department infrastructure and covers the cafeteria and the entire Lilian Baylis Studio. The setup also provides coverage for all basement areas including technical offices, dressing rooms, and the orchestra pit, and even provides full coverage in the Sadler's Wells Studios — despite the studios' separation from the antennas by several concrete walls.

The Bolero system covers the spacious theatre with only four antennas and numerous beltpacks.

The Bolero system covers the spacious theatre with only four antennas and numerous beltpacks.

Mark Noble, Head of Sound at Sadler's Wells, has designed a series of workflows for the Bolero using the theatre's NSA-002A interface. In one example, the team has reassigned the Bolero system's red Reply button on stage managers' beltpacks to open a channel to the paging system through the 4W-Interface. This enables stage managers to use the paging system to make backstage calls to all the dressing rooms and other backstage areas from wherever they are.

With another profile, the Reply button switches between brightness modes to allow the user to remain unseen onstage. The theatre's NSA-002A sits on a comms network switch that is attached to Wi-Fi, making it easy to reconfigure on the go using a tablet.

In related news: Riedel supplied a turnkey A/V solution for the 2019 Pan American and Parapan American Games, which recently wrapped up in Lima, Peru. Riedel's technologies, coupled with comprehensive on-site service and support, ensured flexible, clear, and reliable signal transport and communications for both games.

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