SSL Network I/O Now “JT-NM Tested”

As equipment vendors begin to independently verify that their products are capable of interoperating with third-party devices in an IP environment, they have subjected them to rigorous testing conducted by the EBU, giving customers the confidence they need to make purchasing decisions.

As one of the latest to pass muster, Solid State Logic (SSL) has announced that it has successfully gained “JT-NM Tested” ST 2110 certification for its HC Bridge SRC and other signal processing devices from the SSL Network I/O range. The certification means that its devices are compliant with ST 2110-30 and ST 2022-7 to conformance levels A, B and C, all of which can be used simultaneously to receive and transmit streams on a single device.

The SSL HC Bridge SRC provides 256 bi-directional channels of sample rate conversion for AoIP networks. It facilitates connecting audio between devices running at different sample rates or in different clock domains on Dante (48 kHz and 96 kHz), AES67 or ST 2110-30 networks.

Applications for the HC Bridge SRC include as a standalone device providing bulk sample rate conversion between 48 and 96 kHz sources on the same network, or alternatively as a firewall to provide control and discovery separation between two networks.

Production scenarios include providing separation between venue and OB networks at large-scale events, or between a Dante-based studio network and standards-based transmission network in a broadcast facility.

SSL’s Network I/O portfolio is a range of devices that facilitate the use of IP Audio networking using Audinate's Dante technology for broadcast audio production. Dante is an IP Audio Network that uses standard IT infrastructure for audio transport, routing, device discovery and control. In built discoverability, Remote Device Control, and plug-and-play operation makes Dante the ideal solution for broadcast production using IP Audio networks. With Dante committed to conform to AVB standards AES67 and SMPTE 2110, the SSL Network I/O range is ready for future networked audio developments.

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