Cinegy Heralds SRT For Software Defined Television

Cinegy is touring the advantage of Secure Reliable Transport (SRT), the open source internet streaming protocol developed by Haivision at IBC. It will also be talking up its 8K credentials.

Cinegy Head of Product Management Lewis Kirkaldie describes SRT as “an extra bit of magic that breaks the restrictive chains of having to establish connectivity by plugging in a cable somewhere. Using SRT, the ability to ensure a signal gets to and from where it needs to be is now both feasible and widely available. “What that means is that with SRT you can locate content, tools, and services wherever your business needs them, be it in the cloud, on rented virtual machines, on-prem, or at remote data centres.”

Cinegy’s view is that the maturity of SRT opens the door to a sizable range of new applications while vastly simplifying existing ones.

“SRT is a massive liberator,” Kirkaldie adds. “SRT makes system design so much easier. You can design exactly what you want to deliver, with precisely the results you need, irrespective of inputs, outputs, or location. There is no longer any reason to compromise your business goals due to connectivity or bandwidth limitations.”

SRT is baked in to Cinegy software, including the license, which should remove concerns about whether users have the legal right, proper subscription, or adequate bandwidth to deploy the software.

In the case of 8K, Cinegy has talked this up for several years now and has its entire product line to be 8K-ready and deployed in the cloud. The new Cinegy Multiviewer, in addition to being 8K capable, has had its GPU further improved “to make the Multiviewer even more powerful and flexible when paired with Cinegy Air PRO Playout and Cinegy Capture PRO Ingest.”

Using the same hardware, both systems are not only capable of capturing 8K in 10-bit at up to 60, but also four channels of UHD/4K.

Cinegy products can process mixed SD, HD, 4K/UHD, and 8K formats - as well as handle HDR - for capture, playout, monitoring, news, editing, or MAM. All of the products displayed at IBC 2019 are available for immediate deployment.

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