Interra Systems and Dolby Expand Partnership

Dolby Vision on the BATON QC Platform gives OTT video providers new tools to deliver better-quality HDR experiences across all screens.

Interra Systems and Dolby recently announced an extension to their business partnership. Interra Systems' BATON file-based quality control (QC) platform has now been integrated with Dolby Vision, a next-generation standard that delivers superior high dynamic range (HDR) and wide color gamut (WCG) viewing experiences. BATON already supports Dolby Atmos, an audio format for creating and playing back multichannel movie soundtracks for three-dimensional effect.

Dolby Vision transforms entertainment experiences with ultra-vivid picture quality with incredible brightness, contrast, color, and detail that bring entertainment to life before viewers' eyes. With support for Dolby Vision, BATON can now decode and apply the metadata contained in Dolby Vision streams.

This enables OTT video service providers to unlock new functionalities such as the ability to check for conformance against Dolby Vision, decoding of Dolby Vision content, and checking for the presence of Dolby Vision metadata. Dolby Atmos transports consumers from an ordinary moment into an extraordinary experience with moving audio — sound that fills the room and flows all around with breathtaking realism to create a powerful entertainment experience.

As the industry's leading QC platform, BATON enables service providers to perform comprehensive video, audio, and closed caption checks. Featuring a flexible and scalable architecture, BATON is perfect for OTT providers that are looking to grow their video streaming service, improve efficiencies, and provide exceptional audio-video quality on every device.

"Interra Systems has always been very aggressive in adding support for Dolby technology in its QC tools," said Vijeta Kashyap, vice president of operations at Interra Systems. "This latest expansion of our partnership will enable customers to perform QC and analyze Dolby Vision and Dolby Atmos streams in production and delivery workflows, expediting the time to market of high-quality HDR content. With the fast adoption of Dolby Vision and Dolby Atmos on devices such as TVs and smartphones, supporting this new technology is a must for today's OTT video providers if they want to deliver rich, immersive viewing experiences."

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