Cinegy To Launch Cinegize At 2019 NAB Show

At the 2019 NAB Show, Cinegy will launch ‘Cinegize’, a solution which uses the company’s acclaimed Daniel2 GPU encoding technology to provide extremely low latency KVM-Over-IP.

The solution is a has particularly attractive applications within the eSport field — where many video sources are signals from PCs and workstations running a wide range of applications (CAD/CAM, VR, 3D design, GIS, medical, etc.) and large KVM matrices and recently IP replacements manage relay and switching of signals.

Cinegy’s GPU codec technology, radically simplifies this process, making expensive hardware-based KVM solutions a thing of the past — because with Cinegize, a computer is just another video source.

Quality remains paramount, therefore the solution provides 8K RGBA 10bit, or higher, at frame rates of up to 144Hz.

Cinegize directly grabs a graphics card’s frame buffer and performs visually lossless compression on the video data using Cinegy’s Daniel2 GPU codec, meaning the data does not have to be moved off the card, and only a fraction of the massive compute power of the GPU is required. 

In less than 2ms an entire frame is encoded, and while encoding, it starts sending the frame for the receiver to decode the frame. The resulting latency is extremely low — generally under 16ms. Meaning that every computer or workstation is now potentially a high-quality HD, 4K or 8K video source that can broadcast output across a network that anyone with permission can watch, control, and record. Quick, simplified direct unicast connections are also possible.

The solution can also be used for desktop virtualisation (e.g. to make a high-end CAD/CAM NVIDIA equipped workstation available via an inexpensive client PC or laptop), integrates into enterprise networks, is easily deployable, and can be installed as an automatically starting system service.

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