Audi’s e-tron Commercial Shot with Sony Venice

Audi chose Sony’s CineAlta Full-Frame system camera Venice to shoot the commercial of its first all-electric car model, the new e-tron. The commercial was produced by Kropac Media and shot in a quiet and natural environment to highlight the car’s practically silent engine. Sony’s Venice, equipped with a full-frame image sensor capable of capturing stunning visuals in almost any format and delivering a great depth of field, perfectly replicated the quiet atmosphere of electric driving on screen - a key reason Audi and Kropac Media relied on the Venice camera system for this shoot.

“Our film is all about the emotion and the ecofriendly lifestyle of driving an Audi e-tron. The Venice camera system from Sony was perfect for this," comments Philip Hollerbach, Executive Producer Film of Audi’s communication team.

“The large full-frame sensor creates a soft and discreet image which radiates calmness and positions the e-tron as a future-oriented product," adds Berti Kropac, Managing Director at Kropac Media.

Sony Venice’s support of 24 x 36mm dimensions, achieving a maximum resolution of up to 6K for sophisticated visual effects and its servo-controlled 8-step mechanical ND filter mechanism built into the camera chassis were particularly helpful for the exterior shooting of the Audi commercial. Giving the production company power to instantly change all filter stages in increments from 0.3 to 2.4, the camera operators could quickly react to light changes and minimise downtime.

Often producing dynamic driving shots of new Audi models for use at trade fairs or world premiere events, Kropac Media further explained: "Within just two seconds, the Venice changes the ND filter at the touch of a button. This is not possible with any other camera system yet.”

As the brand’s first all-electric series model, the Audi e-tron celebrated its world premiere in San Francisco on September 17th. The sporty electric SUV combines the space and comfort of a typical luxury car with a range suitable for everyday use.

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