Sanken Brings Back Compact Condenser Microphones

Sanken has revived its CU-31 and CU-32 compact condenser recording microphones.

Initially discontinued in the U.S., Sanken has brought back the mics as part of the Sanken Chromatic series. Relatively similar, the CU-31 features an on-axis pickup pattern while the CU-32 has a perpendicular side-firing pattern, but both feature Sanken's original Push-Pull type capsule design.

In addition to their maximum SPL of 148 dB at one percent THD, the mics reportedly offer a frequency response from 20 Hz to 18,000 Hz. Less than five inches in length, the CU-31 and CU-32 are small, lightweight microphones intended for use recording acoustic guitar, brass and woodwinds, chorus vocals, drums, strings and sound effects.

The mics each house a light, corrosion-free, one-micron titanium diaphragm. Each is priced at $995.

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