Apantac Shows High Density In New MultiViewer Options at IBC

In addition to celebrating its tenth year serving the industry, at the 2018 IBC Show, Apantac will spotlight a new generation of multiviewers and KVM over IP switches.

Addressing a key demand of the market to have more multiviewer heads or outputs in a single piece of hardware, Apantac will show its new TX# system, which brings a modular approach that offers flexibility as well as high-quality visualization and monitoring for broadcast master control playout facilities. This modular architecture allows the user to install different rear input modules with HDMI, ST-2022-6/ST-2110 (video over IP) and SDI over fiber inputs. The company also said that 12G and HDMI 2.0 options will be available soon.

The TX # offers a high number of multiviewer outputs with the added benefit of routing switching capabilities in order to route all inputs to all outputs – all in a single piece of hardware. It supports 64 inputs and 64 outputs, including 16 fully featured multiviewer outputs and a modular approach to choosing input formats.

The unit also comes with 3G/HD/SD-SDI, composite inputs and 3G/HD-SDI outputs.

A key feature is the ability to send any video source / input to any of the sixteen multiviewer outputs. In addition, any video input can be sent to any router output that isn’t already assigned to a multiviewer output.

The company will also display a new HDMI 2.0 Multiviewer for UHD/4K Image Processing (including KVM models). This new UE series accepts four (Model: UE-4) or eight (Model: UE-8) HDMI 2.0 inputs and HDMI 2.0, 12G SDI and down-converted 1080p SDI outputs.

The series supports multiple VESA and CEA input resolutions up to 3840x2160p 60Hz (UHD) and 4096x2160p 60Hz (4K) and various output resolutions up to UHD/4K.

The architecture is based on a 4x1 cascadable multiviewer, which allows facilities to increase the number of inputs to be monitored on a single display.

One of the unique features for the TAHOMA UE is the optional KVM function. With these models, multiple computers connected to them can be controlled via a single mouse and keyboard. Users gain control of a given computer by simply moving the mouse over the corresponding window on the multiviewer output.

Apantac’s new KVM over IP Extenders can be used as extenders/receivers to gain point-to-point extension of HDMI, DVI, or analog VGA over CATx architectures. Functioning as a KVM over IP matrix, the units provide one-to-many or many-to-many console to server access.

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