Work Microwave at IBC

The need for flexible, scalable and future-proof satcom solutions is becoming increasingly more apparent to broadcasters and MVPDs.

Work Microwave showed a live demonstration at IBC2018 of its new AX-80 modem. During a live on-stand demonstration, visitors observed the exceptional spectrum output and high-quality signal transmission enabled by the AX-80 modem. The AX-80 is the world's first functional wideband modem that supports the DVB-S2X standard, with 500 Msps bi-directional throughput and it is now shipping worldwide.

Integrated with 10G Ethernet interfaces, the modem supports full throughput with 256APSK and 3 Gbps per direction, without any compromises or tradeoffs. Using this next-gen device, operators can optimize the use of high-speed, IP-based broadcast and broadband access in future Ka-band or Q/V band satellite systems with wideband transponders.

The modem is built using a flexible software-defined radio (SDR) architecture, which allows user-defined data processing for a wide range of applications and customized solutions. Featuring an all-IP structure, the AX-80 platform supports native network operation as well as data streaming over IP, providing satellite operators with the flexibility that is critical in today's fast-changing connected world.

Work Microwave also showcased an enhanced graphical user interface for its entire solutions portfolio. The new design simplifies and improves the user experience, providing context-specific online help and a responsive layout with multiple windows on one screen.

The company also demonstrated its 3-channel, V-band block upconverter at IBC2018. Offering support for higher frequencies, between 47.2 and 51.4 GHz, this innovative solution optimizes the use of Ultra High Throughput Satellites (UHTS).

In addition, the company also showed its RSCC-X compact N+1 redundancy switch that enables hot standby redundancy for up to eight modems or converters. The redundancy switching system monitors the health of the protected units and, in case of an alarm, copies the failed unit's configuration to the redundant unit, automatically replacing the faulty unit's functions with the spare (+1) unit.

Until recently, this N:1 redundancy system only supported converters; it has now been enhanced to support Work Microwave's digital solutions, including modulators and modems.

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