​Facilis Technology Displays Shared File System Advances

Facilis has Version 7.1 of its shared file system and FastTracker 2.5 on show at the RAI.

The latest release of the Facilis Shared File System includes a new web console interface and shared file system enhancements. Further features include real-time and historical bandwidth monitoring of volumes and workstations; RAID50 and RAID51 management; preferred connection address for multi-path networks; automatic load balancing of clients across server IPs; remote client deployment for ease of upgrades in multi-client facilities.

With Facilis FastTracker 2.5, users can organize custom ingest-to-archive workflows to LTFS and disk-based backup. Previews of local storage assets, as well as LTFS and network-based assets can be generated and stored for easy locating. Catalogs can be created for separation and security of indexed data, and using the new Adobe Panel for Premiere Pro and After Effects, all indexed data is available directly in the Adobe interface.

“Even the average facility has hundreds of thousands of video and audio files that are often very difficult to locate,” said James McKenna, VP of Marketing at Facilis Technology. “By adopting a painless policy of indexing and cataloguing data with FastTracker, our customers have increased efficiency, and provided the creative staff with full access to the facility library.”

The new Facilis Hub Server, which has been deployed at several large and notable customer sites, will also be on display. The Facilis Hub Server “optimizes drive groups and increases the bandwidth available from standard TerraBlock storage systems,” says McKenna. “It gives new customers a way to scale bandwidth through dynamic aggregation, and current customers a way to extend the usable life of older systems. With speeds over 4GB/sec available from a single virtual project-based volume, Hub Server systems offer industry-leading capability.” 

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