Chaos Group Releases V-Ray Next for 3ds Max

Chaos Group brings faster rendering to Autodesk’s 3ds Max with a new Light Cache and parallel processing

The goal of Chaos Group’s new V-Ray Next for Autodesk’s 3ds Max 3D animation and modeling software is to merge the benefits of their highly efficient renderer with the advantages of smart tech.

When I interviewed him, Lon Grohs, Chaos Group's CCO, had just returned from their first worldwide event, “Total Chaos”, held in Sofia Tech Park near their headquarters in Sofia, Bulgaria, celebrating the art, science and technology of computer graphics.

Graphic artists came from all over the world, especially eastern Europe, for the two days of Total Chaos event.

Graphic artists came from all over the world, especially eastern Europe, for the two days of Total Chaos event.

That smart tech enables V-ray to adopts learning techniques for automatic scene analysis, letting artist produce faster and cleaner renders with little to no input by removing set-up time from the creative process.

“V-ray rendering software is widely used in many industries to make things that don’t exist,” Grohs began. “Since we are a ray tracing technology, as opposed to being a rasterized game engine, we provide the highest fidelity.”

That’s why you’ve seen their software used in the latest “Avengers” film, “Black Panther", “Game of Thrones”, and the “Star Trek” series as well as automotive design.

This new V-Ray Next software introduces “scene intelligence” boosting overall rendering performance by up to 25% thanks to a new V-Ray GUP architecture.

It also introduces two new breakthroughs:

There’s a new Adaptive Dome Light (ADL) that automatically produces up to 7x faster image-based environmental lighting that can be essential for architectural interiors without the need for skylight portals bringing light in from windows and openings.

Adaptive Dome Light indtroduces light into a scene without sources

Adaptive Dome Light indtroduces light into a scene without sources

Scene intelligence is also applied to the V-Ray Physical Camera. Automatic Exposure, Automatic White Balance and a simplified UI make creating a perfect render as easy as taking a snapshot.

“Our newest version of the software lays the ground for what we think will be the future of processing, whether it be GPU- or CPU-based,” Grohs said. The way it works is we have invented a technology called Light Cache, which is a way of calculating bounced light, or global illumination. This gives optical qualities to V-Ray Next, letting it speed up the process of how light gives form to optical properties.”

The V-Ray Physical Camera can compensate for under exposure. Click to enlarge.

The V-Ray Physical Camera can compensate for under exposure. Click to enlarge.

Basically, it accelerates the process of turning a grey box into, say, a dragon.

Grohs went on to explain that additional speed is acquired by the introduction of what they call the “multi kernel”, benefiting from parallel processing with today's faster GPU rendering cores.

You can see how well this can be applied when looking at one of rendering’s greatest challenges—hair material.

“We have incorporated what we call a new ‘hair material’ into our software so you can adjust the color simply by adding more melanin,” Grohs described. “Now you can just dial it in with a slider.”

You adjust the hair color just as a make-up artist would. Click to enlarge.

You adjust the hair color just as a make-up artist would. Click to enlarge.

“Everything that is done in ray tracing is based on physics,” Grohs finished up. “In this case, the hair material doesn’t look like a tube of spaghetti. It looks like microscopic particles that actually make up real hair.

Let us know what you think…

Log-in or Register for free to post comments…

You might also like...

Server-Based “At Home” Workflows Provide Efficiency For NASCAR Productions

NASCAR Productions, based in Charlotte NC, prides itself on maintaining one of the most technically advanced content creation organizations in the country. It’s responsible for providing content, graphics and other show elements to broadcasters (mainly Fox and NBC), as w…

Special Report: Super Bowl LIII – The Technology Behind the Broadcast

New England Patriot quarterback, Tom Brady, entered Mercedes Benz stadium in Atlanta, GA on February 3rd having already won five Super Bowl games. And through four-quarters of play, all delivered by a television crew of hundreds of technicians, sports casters…

Weather Channel Uses Immersive Mixed Reality to Educate Viewers About the Dangers From Winter Ice

In their latest hyper-realistic VR weather warning, The Weather Channel helps viewers better understand the potential dangers created by ice storms.

CBS Sports Looks To Raise The Graphics Bar For Super Bowl LIII

Captivating 3D graphics and electronically inserted field images have become a hallmark of every major live sporting event, but CBS Sports hopes to raise the bar during this year’s NFL Super Bowl LIII telecast on February 3, 2019. The sports network’s g…

Behind a Wall of High Tech Gadgetry, CBS Super Bowl’s Anchors Focus on Old-School Storytelling

Behind the more than 100 television cameras and an arsenal of the most advanced broadcast technology ever assembled, the anchors reporting the 53rd Super Bowl will concentrate on the ancient art of storytelling.