EuclidiQ Unleashes AI Based Content-Adaptive Encoding at NAB 2018

EuclidIQ, a video compression company based in Concord, Massachusetts, is releasing Rithm, a cloud-based content-adaptive transcoder incorporating AI (Artificial Intelligence) techniques, at NAB 2018.

The company claims this approach involving training on human subjective test data to optimize perceptual quality, reduces buffering by anywhere in the range 15% to 75% depending on content type, without any net bandwidth penalty. Furthermore, content encoded this way starts playing faster and consumes less storage, the company adds.

According to EuclidiQ, as OTT services continue to gain ground at the expense of legacy pay TV, service providers face mounting complaints from viewers over online streaming quality and performance. It is therefore more imperative than ever for advertisers and distributors to provide higher quality video streams at lower bitrates, with faster start and less buffering.

Rithm is hosted in Amazon Web Services which makes integration into existing cloud workflows more scalable. “Our goal with Rithm is to simplify high-quality, optimized encoding, which can sometimes be considered a dark art,” said EuclidIQ CEO, Richard Wingard. “With Rithm, customers just send our service a video file, and our resultant output video will meet the strictest quality benchmarks while starting faster and buffering less."

Rithm is designed to lower the output bitrate of each video encoding as much as possible to maximize bandwidth savings, while maintaining a baseline video quality. This is the objective of content-aware encoding designed to exploit the fact that some scenes require higher bit rates than others to achieve a given level of quality as perceived by the human eye. For example, a 720p animated movie with smooth surfaces or textures and relatively little content can be encoded at 1.5 Mbps at the same quality as an action movie or sports program with a lot of movement or rapid scene changes at 3 Mbps. So if all titles are encoded at the same bitrate, a lot of bits are being wasted on slower smoother content.

Furthermore, by streaming such content at the lower bit rate, it is possible to reduce buffering and improve start time. For this reason, some of the major content houses such as Netflix have been re-encoding their entire catalogues to match bit rate to content type. The idea of products such as Euclid iQ’s Rithm is to extend these benefits to smaller service providers or content owners that lack Netflix’s resources to do the re-encoding directly. The company claims that the use of AI to train the algorithm helps ensure that bit rate is reduced as far as possible for a given level of perceptual quality. 

Let us know what you think…

Log-in or Register for free to post comments…

You might also like...

Broadcast For IT - Part 9 - Color Space

In this series of articles, we will explain broadcasting for IT engineers. Television is an illusion, there are no moving pictures and todays broadcast formats are heavily dependent on decisions engineers made in the 1930’s and 1940’s, and in this art…

Articles You May Have Missed – May 30, 2018

A battle is brewing among some equipment providers focused on, you guessed it, more pixels. And, if history is any predictor, the broadcast and production industries may in fact soon be faced with managing images composed of approximately 33 million pixels.…

Unpacking The Repack: New Technology Can Speed The Process And Introduce Additional Benefits

The FCC has set out a tight timeline for broadcasters to vacate the 600MHz UHF band, and now the goalposts are moving. With mobile carriers itching to start using the spectrum freed up by the repack, some players like T-Mobile…

Articles You May Have Missed – May 9, 2018

The NAB 2018 convention made clear that Over-The-Air (OTA) broadcasters are about to be handed a new transmission platform, which enables a wealth of exciting business opportunities. Yet many owners and engineers have yet to understand just what those options might…

Post NAB 2018 - A Different Perspective

Whether the exhibits and technology would represent more hype than promise was a key question going into NAB 2018. Attendees expected developments on ATSC 3.0 and the industry’s migration toward IP infrastructures. Perhaps most surprising was the high level of interest i…