DeltaCast Adds HDR Support Across Video Cards

DeltaCast continues to add new support for high dynamic range (HDR) formats across its range of video capture cards. With its latest VideoMaster OEM SDK (v.6.04) for DeltaCast products under Windows, Linux and macOS, HDR format signaling can be added to all DeltaCast SDI cards. This makes HDR capability accessible for all developers on DeltaCast products.

The VideoMaster SDK is a software interface to communicate with DeltaCast video cards and to design your own products and applications.

DeltaCast’s first product to support HDR is the dual-channel HDMI 2.0b video card. In addition, DeltaCast’s free EDID Editor application now supports CTA 861-G extension blocks dealing with HDR static and dynamic metadata linked to HDMI 2.0.

Thanks to an advanced EDID management with custom content support, the DELTA-hdmi20-elp 20 seamlessly brings virtually any HDMI signals into a media server.

Thanks to an advanced EDID management with custom content support, the DELTA-hdmi20-elp 20 seamlessly brings virtually any HDMI signals into a media server.

The model DELTA-hdmi20-elp 20 HDMI 2.0b capture card, features two inputs with support of any HDMI formats, including HDMI 2.0 (600MHz TMDS) 4K 60Hz 4:4:4 8-bit simultaneously on both ports. It is specially tuned for high-performance applications such as dual 4K (and UHDTV) 60Hz capture and HDR formats. Included is on-board color processing features, embedded audio support, and HDMI metadata support.

Thanks to an advanced EDID management with custom content support, the DELTA-hdmi20-elp 20 seamlessly brings virtually any HDMI signals into a media server. With an impressive performance-versus-power consumption ratio on very a compact form factor with passive cooling, this card is the ideal solution for applications where performance and reliability are critical. This product can be used in a DisplayPort application with a converter cable available from DeltaCast.

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