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KHM Installs Streamlined Workflow Technology For NY Giants Football Team

Facing an ever-increasing demand for content to support both broadcast and online programming, the video production staff of the NFL New York Giants football team turned to systems integrator KMH Integration to design and install a completely unified file workflow, from ingest to post production to playout.

The call came once it became clear that the Giants needed to secure more post-production resources while utilizing their existing space at the Quest Diagnostics training facility in East Rutherford NJ.

Working with KMH Integration, the Giants took a long look at inventory and needs, budget and timelines to define how the physical space could be better utilized to squeeze out improved efficiencies.

“Increasing the physical space was not an option,” said Kevin Henneman, president of KMH. “So we had to get creative in making this work within the existing confines.”

What followed was a plan for spatial re-organization and file workflow consolidation, which allowed the team’s postproduction capacity to be increased by 50 percent. Adding higher density equipment – essentially retrofitting more flexibility and firepower – into existing space delivered greater productivity for production staff.

At the same time, the Giants decided to pursue improvements to the production control room workflow and structure. Giants and KMH technicians designed and built an audio control booth to deliver greater acoustic isolation, thereby increasing the audio quality of their productions. They even added a new matrix-based intercom communications system for improved team collaboration.

Finally, the reorganization included improvements to IT networking, graphics and postproduction equipment. By consolidating the editing and graphics workstations into a shared storage environment, simpler access resulted all around.

“It was ambitious but we accomplished what we set out to do with cooperation and teamwork from our staff and KMH,” said Don Sperling, vice president/executive producer, NY Giants. “It was done with careful planning, efficiency and speed, and the returns are already paying off.”

Located approximately a quarter mile from MetLife Stadium, where the Giants play their home games, Quest houses a studio and control room for the team’s postgame, training-camp, and press-conference shows, as well as year-round digital content.

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