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Daylight Viewable Reference Monitor Unveiled at IBC

Building on the success of its daylight viewable monitors, SmallHD debuted its brightest, full-featured 17” reference grade monitor ever made.

The SmallHD 1703-P3X was introduced to the industry at the recent IBC. It has double the brightness of other 17” reference monitors. It is designed to be used in full sunlight, and it covers 100 percent of the DCI-P3 and Rec 709 color spaces. The 1703-P3X also features a 1500:1 contrast ratio and a 179° viewing angle, along with SmallHD’s Pagebuilder OS toolset.

Designed to serve the demanding color display requirements of both on-set and post production color grading professionals, the 1703-P3X comes pre-calibrated for DCI-P3 and Rec 709 for both broadcast use and cinema mastering. Covering 100% DCI-P3 with a Delta E average of <0.5, it offers easy installation of the user’s own 3D LUT calibration with advanced color management solutions such as the Light Illusion LightSpace CMS, or the Portrait Displays SpectraCal CalMAN.

The 1703-P3X features one HDMI and two SDI inputs plus one HDMI and two SDI outputs. The fast and intuitive operating system allows ganging of on-screen tools like HD waveform, vectorscope, false color, focus peaking and 2x zebra bars simultaneously. Its Dual View function allows users to monitor two input sources simultaneously with side-by-side viewing.

The new monitor’s bright display supports any LUT workflow through SmallHD’s ColorFlow 3D LUT Engine which enables 3D LUT support, allowing previously created look-up tables to be used on-set. LUTS can be applied via the monitor’s full-size SD slot. This information can also be pushed downstream to other monitors. A LUT altered on-set with third party software, such as LiveGrade, can be viewed on the monitor and/or downstream monitors, and uploaded to an SD card for reference in post.

The 1703P3X is constructed of rugged milled aluminum to withstand the rigor of production. It features numerous ¼-inch and 3/8-inch threaded mounting points, a VESA mount and RapidRail accessory mounting system. The monitor can easily power wireless accessories like Teradek with built in 12V 2-pin LEMO auxiliary power. It can be powered via 4-pin XLR by optional V-mount and Gold-mount battery packs for wireless operation.

“This monitor is both bright, extremely color accurate, and offers true reference grade cinema color,” explains Wes Philips, SmallHD co-founder. “Covering 100% of the DCI-P3 color space, it’s the perfect monitor for DIT’s on-set or location and for mastering in post.”

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