BroaMan Introduces the Repeat8-NANO

BroaMan has introduced the Repeat8-NANO, a compact, four-channel fiber transport converter for 4K transmission.

BroaMan said the “NANO” is the smaller brother of the Repeat48, which offers electrical-to-optical, as well as optical-to-electrical conversion. This complete, plug ‘n’ play, 4K fiber transport comes in a single box and is therefore ideally placed for facilities requiring simple 4K transmission.

BroaMan said the Repeat8-NANO comes in two stand-alone versions: the Repeat8-NANO 4IN features four SDI inputs and four fiber SFP outputs (electrical-to-optical conversion) and the Repeat8-NANO 4OUT features four SDI outputs and four fiber SFP inputs (optical to electrical conversion).

Both devices can be connected with a quad or duplex fiber, creating four-channel point-to-point transport. Each box can also be connected to the larger Repeat48 or even to the Route66 for distant router I/O.

Mux22 Series with Intercom-BNC Extension

Mux22 Series with Intercom-BNC Extension

BroaMan also enhanced its Mux22 series with the Intercom-BNC extension. The Mux22 was originally conceived as a series of application engineered devices offering multiple signal support in a compact 1RU chassis.

The new Mux22 BNC Intercom version allows the connection of up to eight intercom panels or matrix ports using coax cable in AES3id standard (a 75-ohm BNC electrical variant of AES3). The coax connectors can be also used to interface with any AES3id device.There are eight bi-directional AES BNC ports, each of which can handle 2-In and 2-Out.


Audio routing is possible between AES ports and any other audio interfaces provided by Optocore or BroaMan (such as analog, Cat5 or copper AES and fiber or coax MADI). In total, the 1RU device features video; 8 x 3G-SDI channels; audio: 16-In/16-out; 4 x GPIO or RS485; Sync I/O; 2 x LAN; 2 x SANE/LAN; 2 x Optocore links; fiber tunnel for generic protocol. It can all be transported over a single duplex fiber to another Mux22 (point to point) or Route66 (network) device.

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