Canon Announces Its Newest Professional 4K HDR Reference Display

The Canon DP-V2411 4K HDR Reference 24-inch Display features stable high-luminance and 12G-SDI terminals.

Canon’s proprietary display image processor, LED direct backlight system design and an In-Plane Switching (IPS) LCD screen, provides detailed and precise color reproduction as well as high resolution, high contrast, and high luminance, allowing for accurate review and confirmation of 4K and HDR video content.

The DP-V2411 reaches peak luminance and full-screen white luminance of 600 cd/m. The high full-screen luminance helps prevent changes in luminance that can occur when viewing video images.

The DP-V2411features stable high-luminance performance for confirmation of 4K HDR video when shooting on location or in a studio.

The Canon DP-V2411 display features 12G-SDI terminals requiring a user to only use a single cable. A 4K reference display equipped with 3G-SDI would require four cables to transmit 4K 60p footage, By reducing the number of necessary cables, the display supports more cost-efficient, less time-consuming installation, while reducing weight and saving space.

DP-V2411 4K HDR Reference Display - Back Left.

DP-V2411 4K HDR Reference Display - Back Left.

Alongside the current lineup of Canon 4K HDR reference display, the Canon DP-V2411 supports Electro-Optical Transfer Functions (EOTF) such as Hybrid Log-Gamma, a broadcasting HDR standard; Perceptual Quantizer (PQ), a HDR standard for film production and transfer; and Canon’s proprietary log gammas—Canon Log, Canon Log 2 and Canon Log 3.

The new display features convenient shooting assist functions for all HDR standards as a waveform monitor which displays the luminance level of input signals and has a false color function, which overlays different areas of input images with colors depending on their luminance allowing for convenient review and confirmation of HDR images.

Pricing and Availability

The DP-V2411 is scheduled to be available in early December 2017 for an estimated retail price of $20000.

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