Tascam Introduces Low Cost 24-Bit, 96 kHz Recording Interface

Tascam has debuted the US-1x2 — a 24-bit, 96 kHz desktop recording interface that offers professional quality pro audio recording for less than $100.

Tascam said the USB 2.0 recording interface is portable and can be USB bus-powered for mobile operation with a Mac or Windows laptop. A secondary five volt mini-USB power input is provided for iOS devices and for standalone operation.

The US-1x2 has an XLR microphone input that employs Tascam’s Ultra-HDDA mic preamp. It uses discrete components and features an -125 dBu EIN rating and 101 dB signal-to-noise ratio. The company said the noise level is so low it's almost inaudible.

The Ultra-HDDA preamp has a 57 dB gain range and switchable +48V phantom power. The front panel has a switchable, 1/4-inch line/instrument input that enables recording a mono line-level signal or capturing a guitar or electric bass without needing a direct box. On the unit's rear, a pair of RCA line inputs admit signals from stereo consumer audio devices, such as tape decks and media players.

The headphone output has an 18 mW/channel amplifier. Front-panel LEDs indicate signal present, peak/clip, phantom power active and USB active. Zero-latency direct monitoring can be enabled with a rear-panel switch or in the included settings panel software for Mac and Windows. The software also accesses the stereo/mono input monitor, input mute and audio source output.

The US-1x2 is class compliant for macOS and is compatible with Windows PCs using a ASIO driver. Recording and playback can be accomplished with iOS devices such as an iPhone or iPad, using an Apple Camera Connection Kit. Steinberg's Cubase LE DAW is for Mac and Windows and Cubasis LE DAW for iOS are included with the device.

The US-1x2 USB audio interface is priced at $99.

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