IK Multimedia Debuts ARC System 2.5 Room Correction System

IK Multimedia has announced its new ARC System 2.5, the first acoustic correction system that combines a MEMS (microelectro-mechanical systems) omnidirectional measurement microphone with room correction software for most Mac/PC DAWs.

IK Multimedia said the new system employs Audyssey MultEQ XT32, a new technology that greatly improves the audio monitoring accuracy of speakers in any studio or room listening environment. The system will ship in July, 2017 for $199.99.

MEMS Microphone

MEMS Microphone

The company called the system the most cost-effective, professional solution for consistent sound and frequency response accuracy across the entire spectrum in any room, whether acoustically treated or untreated. It replaces an earlier system.

IK Multimedia first began using MEMS (microelectro-mechanical systems) microphones in their popular iRig Acoustic range first released in 2015, and now they are the first to bring them to the field of measurement microphones.

The new MEMS measurement microphone included in ARC 2.5 works together with the room correction software to achieve greater correction accuracy with a precision of +/- 0.5 dB.

IK Multimedia said MEMS microphones offer extreme resistance to humidity and temperature variations as well as increased shock resistance. The Audyssey MultEQ XT32 technology included in ARC 2.5 captures acoustic information at multiple locations throughout a listening area in both the time and frequency domains.

The MultEQ XT32 calculates an equalization solution that corrects both time and frequency response problems in the listening area and performs a fully automated system setup.

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