Report:  Ooyala, The Business Benefits of IP Production

Making IP work in a broadcast facility is an engineering problem to be solved. Understanding why we need IP in the first place requires deep understanding of the business benefits.

Introduction

Answering the question “what is the return on investment for IP?”, this report from Ooyala and the Digital Production Partnership (DPP), gets to the very heart of understanding the business case for IP.

Conducting interviews and workshops with member companies and industry professionals, the DPP has categorized their findings of ten broadcast disciplines, including multi-camera shooting, live streaming, cloud playout and IP distribution, into five score groups:

  • Timing
  • Financial benefits
  • Operational benefits
  • Creative benefits
  • Investment costs

The report starts by defining IP production and makes the rather risky assertion that “SDI is fundamentally inferior to IP”, but goes onto make sound justification of its position.

Interviews with executives from global media and technology companies including Sony, BBC and Sky summarized the ten categories, giving deep insight into the experiences of individuals and the companies they represent.

The report then ranks the disciplines based on which will see the highest business benefits to move to IP now, and offers some key conclusions for broadcasters to consider in their planning.

Image Source: Ooyala; data from DPP Survey Report “The Business Benefits of IP Production”

Image Source: Ooyala; data from DPP Survey Report “The Business Benefits of IP Production”

Summary

This report will help any engineer understand the business needs of a modern broadcast facility, and better communicate with Finance Directors and CEO’s to ensure a smooth IP migration. As such, this report provides a fantastic tool for an engineer needing to understand where to start with IP integration.

Registered readers can download the full report at the link below.

You might also like...

US Open Golf Puts Spotlight On Latency And Scale For Live Streaming

Every big global sporting event exerts stress on streaming infrastructures and challenges providers to deliver further improvements in the viewing experience as demand and traffic levels go on increasing. The 2022 US Open Golf Championship in Brookline, Massachusetts, is particularly under…

IP Security For Broadcasters: Part 8 - RADIUS Network Access

Maintaining controlled access is critical for any secure network, especially when working with high-value media in broadcast environments.

No Sign Of Innovation Slowing At NAB 2022

Covid-19 may have changed the course of broadcasting but has not slowed its development, judging from NAB 2022, the first major industry show with a physical presence since before the pandemic.

NAB 2022 Shows Less Can Be More For Trade Shows

It has been hard to find vendors or visitors regretting their presence at NAB 2022, or suggesting they will not come next year, despite the significant drop in overall numbers.

Broadcaster D2C Requirements For The 2020s - Part 1

Most national broadcasters in developed countries have app-based OTT services, many of which have been in place for over a decade. Less-developed national broadcasters still rely on YouTube, Social Media platforms, or their own websites to deliver OTT content to…