Tektronix Oscilloscope Expands Test Capabilities

New Tektronix 5 Series MSO Mixed Signal Oscilloscope sets a new standard for performance, analysis, and overall user experience.

Tektronix has broken through the innovation barrier with the introduction of the new 5 Series MSO mixed signal oscilloscope.

Broadcast engineers have always used oscilloscopes for their go-to test and measurement solution, and nearly every engineering maintenance bench includes a reliable general purpose oscilloscope. To effectively and efficiently characterize and debug today's more complex systems, engineers need to look at a larger number and wider variety of signals than in the past. As a clean-slate design, the 5 Series MSO is the world's first oscilloscope with the versatility and deep signal insight needed to meet these challenges.

The new 5 Series MSO redefines the midrange oscilloscope with a variety of innovations. They include the industry's first FlexChannel technology that allows 4, 6 or 8 analog channels and up to 64 digital channels, integrated protocol analysis and signal generator.

12-bit analog to digital converters deliver up to 16 bits of vertical resolution using advanced digital signal processing. See and measure small signal details, even if they’re riding on large signals.

A massive high-definition capacitive touch display and a highly intuitive Direct Access user interface deliver unprecedented flexibility and unmatched visibility into complex embedded systems.

Tektronix designed the 5 Series MSO to be the most flexible, capable and easy-to-use mid-range oscilloscope on the market. The 5 Series MSO prices start at $12,600 US MSRP.

Users interact with the capacitive touch display the same way they do on phones and tablets.

Users interact with the capacitive touch display the same way they do on phones and tablets.

Largest capacitive touchscreen

The 5 Series MSO has the industry's first 15.6-inch capacitive touch, high definition (1920 x 1080) display. With the display comes an advanced pinch-zoom-swipe touchscreen, front panel controls, or mouse to analyze and manage multiple signals without fighting through menus.

The user interface lets users access controls directly through objects on the display rather than having to navigate through menus to get to more menus. The result is faster and more intuitive operation along with considerably more space for viewing waveforms and correlating signals.

Test equipment with inherently less noise allows observation of ever-shrinking signal amplitudes along with the ability to view small signals riding on large signals. The 5 Series MSO incorporates a next generation front end amplifier that lowers noise approximately 4.5 dB from previous generation oscilloscopes. It also uses a 12-bit analog-digital converter (ADC) and a new High Res mode that delivers industry-leading vertical resolution (up to 16 bits). This combination of low noise and high resolution ADC delivers excellent Effective Number of Bits (ENOB) performance.

Windows OS optional

Every oscilloscope on the market today is either a dedicated scope or based on a Windows PC platform that allows users to run other programs on the scope. Each approach has pluses and minuses and many labs have both styles, which leads to problems when users need to switch among test platforms.

The new 5 Series MSO solves this problem by offering the industry's first oscilloscope that can run as either a dedicated scope or in an open Windows configuration. The user can switch between the two simply by adding or removing a solid-state drive that has the Windows license/OS installed on it. When the SSD is installed, the instrument boots Windows. When it's removed, the instrument boots as a dedicated scope. Regardless of the configuration, the scope's user interface drives exactly the same way.

Flexible options, field upgrades

All 5 Series MSOs can be purchased or field upgraded as needs change with an arbitrary/function generator (AFG), digital probes, extended record length up to 125 Mpoints, additional protocol support, and bandwidth up to 1 GHz. An upgrade to 2 GHz is available through Tektronix Service Centers. The scopes are all backed by a three-year warranty.

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