SmallHD Offers Sub-$500 Focus Touchscreen HD Field Monitor

SmallHD has introduced its first touchscreen HD video monitor, the FOCUS, designed for small, low profile camera setups. The 5-inch FOCUS provides daylight visibility and an out-of-the-box mounting solution for $500 and will ship in June.

Wes Phillips, SmallHD Co-Founder, said the goal for the FOCUS was to bring independent filmmakers a tool to significantly increase the production value of their work, without breaking the bank.

The FOCUS has a daylight-viewable 800 nit display, which is sharp enough to achieve critical focus and bright enough to be used outdoors. The lightweight FOCUS attaches securely atop the camera via shoe mount with the included Tilt Arm. With 180 degrees of vertical rotation, the Tilt Arm allows run-and-gun shooters to make quick, smooth monitor adjustments. Included on the FOCUS’ mount is an extra shoe mount for accessories like microphones and video lights.

Along with the included Tilt Arm, DSLR and mirrorless camera users will benefit from the FOCUS’ ability to pass through power to the camera. With a center-mounted Sony L Series battery, the FOCUS can power small format cameras like the Sony Alpha series with its auxiliary power out and camera specific battery adapter cables. This means 2-3 times the camera battery life and fewer batteries to carry, while enjoying a daylight viewable display in the field.

The FOCUS is equipped with micro HDMI input, an SD card slot for loading 3D LUTs, and SmallHD’s professional suite of software tools. Activating tools such as Waveform, Focus Assist, or Pixel Zoom is done with simple touch or swipe of the screen. The touchscreen functionality, combined with the compact size of the FOCUS, makes this 5-inch display a true low-profile monitoring tool with high production value.

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