Zaxcom Introduces ZFR400 Miniature Audio Recorder

Zaxcom has introduced ZFR400, its smallest and lightest professional audio recorder to date.

Zaxcom said the ZFR400 can record professional quality audio as a stand-alone device without the need of additional transmitters or receivers. Audio is recorded internally onto a microSD card using the lossless MARF (Mobile Audio Recording Format) that eliminates file corruption common to recordings due to dead battery or early card removal.

Files are then instantly copied to Broadcast Wave Format (BWF) or MP3 via ZaxConvert, free software available for Mac or PC. A built-in timecode reader and generator will synchronize timecode making it easy for post to organize.

The ZFR400 is housed in a high strength, impact resistant nylon polymer casing with rounded edges, machined metal and rubber gaskets. It measures 2.2 x 1.6 x .55-inches and weighs 2.2 ounces with battery.

Battery door

Battery door

The battery provides up to 10 hours of run time and its door is magnetically latched and sealed to protect it against the harshest of production environments. The combination of the nylon composite case and its power efficiency makes heat transfer practically non-existent, allowing the ZFR400 to run cool.

All Zaxcom miniature recorders come equipped with ZaxNet, a user selectable 2.4 GHz RF signal that provides remote control functionality. ZaxNet can automatically jam timecode on the ZFR400 upon powering, eliminating the need to jam timecode using a cable.

Multiple ZFRs can jam timecode wirelessly under ZaxNet when one ZFR is set as a timecode master. The ZFR400 also provides a timecode output that can be used to jam any SMPTE timecode compatible device.

NeverClip is also included to give an unprecedented 128 dB of dynamic range without clipping audio. While using NeverClip, two separate analog to digital converters work in conjunction to provide a natural distortion free dynamic range.

The recorder has the ability to monitor audio quality of the ZFR400 using a Zaxcom ERX3TCD audio receiver via ZaxNet QC, a selectable high pass filter and a three-pin micro LEMO connector. 

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