Articles You May Have Missed – March 29, 2017

Broadcasters are not an adventurous lot. In fact, the phrase “No change is good,” might describe how some engineers’ think about new technology. A recent survey looked at how broadcast managers and engineers viewed an IP future. Think FUD.

Portable devices are forcing content providers to change how content is delivered.

Portable devices are forcing content providers to change how content is delivered.

The shifting behaviour of young people — who demand their television programming anywhere, anytime and on any device — is forcing a massive re-invention of broadcast technology and is driving a shift toward viewing over the Internet.

That trend is not what’s in dispute. What’s at issue is the resolution to build a flexible broadcast infrastructure that will support such multi-format and multi-platform distribution across platforms. There are many reasons for the reluctance, with the most common being the FUD (fear, uncertainty and doubt) factor.

Major equipment companies supplying broadcasters have developed IP infrastructure products and say that major, more progressive program content providers are moving toward implementing it. But smaller group broadcasters and individual stations are still nervous about the IP future.

Reduce your FUD factor by reading “Many Broadcasters Suffer from IP FUD Say Vendors.”

In the fourth season of 'Bruce's Shorts', Bruce Devlin takes a look at the Interoperable Master Format (IMF). Ever wondered why we don't label the audio channels in files? This episode will help you find out.

Traditionally, audio channel designation was a house standard defined in a broadcaster's delivery specification. This has generally led to the need to remap the audio tracks at the ingest of files to a facility. Why isn't there a common way of labelling the audio? What track goes where and what language is being used?

That's where the Multi-Channel Audio (MCA) labelling specification comes in. MCA works at three levels. The MCA labelling specification is SMPTE ST-377-4, a labelling framework for multichannel audio essence in MXF file structures. It specifies the basic object model, structures and metadata items for the MCA Labelling Framework.

This standard enables text-based representation of Multichannel Audio Labels and defines one such representation.

IMF is standardised by the SMPTE as ST 2067. Learn more in the Bruce’s Shorts video, “What is SMPTE MCA and why do I need it?

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