Special Edition: Super Bowl LI—Technology Insight: RF, Cell and Streaming Systems: Part 2

The Super Bowl isn’t just a Sunday afternoon world championship game. It’s a week-long event with massive TV coverage. Cameras and TV crews from around the globe congregated on this year’s Super Bowl city, Houston, TX, where the game was played in the NRG Stadium.

The Broadcast Bridge’s Part 2 of Super Bowl coverage, we look behind the RF systems, cell technology and streaming systems required to support the broadcast and fans.

Broadcast crews filled the RF spectrum with signals during the run up to Super Bowl LI.

Broadcast crews filled the RF spectrum with signals during the run up to Super Bowl LI.

The broadcast and news crews are visible on the streets and in venues including the NFL Experience at the George R. Brown Convention Center, NFL On Location, Media Row and team headquarters. The question might be, how did all those broadcast teams get their signals live back to their stations and networks?

With an estimated 3,000 frequencies used by over 10,000 radios at the week-long event, having clear communication and program links was top of mind for a small, but highly trained coordination crew. These experts were charged with making sure all the backhaul and comms channels work in a super-charged atmosphere.

Contribution networks weren’t the only RF hogs at Houston’s NRG Stadium. The 72,000 fans eager to share the experience with friends over the internet and social media could quickly overload the normal services. Companies including Sprint, Verizon and AT&T installed COWS (not the milking kind) around key venues to handle the extra load. 

Under seat enclosures at last year's Super Bowl at Levi stadium provided Wi-Fi access for fans. This year's installation at NRG stadium is similar.

Under seat enclosures at last year's Super Bowl at Levi stadium provided Wi-Fi access for fans. This year's installation at NRG stadium is similar.

Once inside the stadium, Wi-Fi was key to fan satisfaction. To serve those customers, an additional 1260 Wi-Fi access ports were installed in the stadium complex.

Want to know more about RF, cell, and streaming technology used at the 2017 Super Bowl? The exciting details are just ahead.

You might also like...

TIM Deploys Android Set Top Boxes From Technicolor

Italian telco TIM has deployed Android TV set-top boxes supplied by Technicolor, giving access to streaming services such as Netflix, Amazon, Infinity, Disney+ and DAZN, as well as traditional linear TV.

BT Sport’s Live VR 360 Coverage Of Premier League Brings Fans Closer To The Action

While the merits of 8K delivery is being debated by broadcasters around the world, some are moving forward with plans to deploy the high resolution quality in creative ways that engage viewers and encourage them to interact with a live…

PTP V2.1 – New Security & Monitoring For IP Broadcast Infrastructures - Part 2

In the last article in this series, we looked at how PTP V2.1 has improved security. In this part, we investigate how robustness and monitoring is further improved to provide resilient and accurate network timing.

Public Service Broadcasters Juggle Linear And Online To Maximize Coverage

The decline of public service broadcasting has been one of those long running narratives that is sometimes defied by reality, like the death of the set top box.

Field Report: NewTek Spark Plus 4K

NDI (Network Device Interface) is a free protocol for Video over IP, developed by NewTek. The key word is “free.”