Brigham Young, Hawaii Starts Path to UHD Production with Hitachi SK‑UHD4000 4K Cameras

Brigham Young University’s Hawaii campus (BYU-Hawaii) is taking its first step towards a 4K production future with the purchase of four Hitachi SK‑UHD4000 UHD studio and field cameras to provide superior-quality video acquisition for its diverse projects and long-term content archives.

Situated on the island of Oahu in Laie, Hawaii, BYU-Hawaii hosts approximately 2,500 undergraduate students who represent over 70 different countries and cultures. At BYU-Hawaii’s Media Production Center (MPC), staff and students produce programming for use both within and beyond the 100-acre campus. Internal productions range from recruiting videos to the live, campus-wide broadcast of the university’s weekly devotional on topics relevant to the Latter-day Saints Church. Original programs including educational shows, documentaries and live BYU-Hawaii Seasider volleyball and basketball games are broadcast on BYU Television, reaching more than 53 million U.S. households via cable and satellite, plus a global audience through its website, Roku channel and mobile apps.

The added resolution of 4K/UHD will future-proof their content for subsequent workflow upgrades. “We are frequently asked by the Church or within the university to bring back historical footage, so the quality of our archives is very important,” said Brenn Nakamitsu, MPC field production manager at BYU-Hawaii. “The future of our footage all starts with the camera, so capturing and archiving it in 4K today will enable us to make the best use of it later when we move to full 4K production.”

Student Hey Ho captures a BYU-Hawaii event with one of the university’s HITACHI SK-UHD4000 UHD cameras. Photo: Monique Saunz.

Student Hey Ho captures a BYU-Hawaii event with one of the university’s HITACHI SK-UHD4000 UHD cameras. Photo: Monique Saunz.

BYU-Hawaii were an existing user of Hitachi Kokusai cameras, and decided to look again to Hitachi for their move to UHD and found a great fit. “The SK-UHD4000s gave us 4K at a price that fit our budget, while providing the same rich features we had in HD,” said Nakamitsu. “Their ability to directly use standard B4-mount bayonet lenses was also a significant benefit, as it allowed us to get started with 4K using our existing HD lenses until we have the budget to replace those too.” 

“For now, we’re continuing to shoot HD for sports, but for bigger events such as the inauguration of our university president, we shoot 4K,” explained Nakamitsu. “The camera system’s concurrent output capabilities and built-in down-conversion let us archive in 4K while simultaneously broadcasting in HD.” 4K footage is archived to Atomos Shogun standalone recorders directly from the CCUs.

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