Husson Buys Hitachi Z-HD6000 Cameras for News Studio

The New England School of Communications at Husson University has added three Z-HD6000 HDTV cameras from Hitachi Kokusai Electric America to the school’s existing complement of Z-HD5000 cameras for studio and field production.

Based in Bangor, Maine,New England School of Communications at Husson University, NESCom, is home to approximately 500 students working toward undergraduate degrees in communications technology, mass communications and entertainment production. NESCom’s video production program provides real-world, experiential learning for students as they create live, broadcast productions within the university and through events with strategic external partners that complement the curriculum. NESCom also has agreements with local broadcast affiliates to air live Division III sports from the Husson University campus, as well as Maine’s only locally-produced, late-night talk show airing statewide. A business pitching competition show, broadcast throughout Maine over NBC affiliate stations, is also recorded at NESCom’s modern television facility.

NESCOM student Alex Fenderson with one of the new Hitachi cameras.

NESCOM student Alex Fenderson with one of the new Hitachi cameras.

The new Hitachi Kokasai Z-HD6000 cameras are used in NESCom’s television studio to produce live newscasts in conjunction with the university’s journalism department, as well as public affairs shows, sports roundup programs and more. Meanwhile, six Z-HD5000 cameras are deployed with the school’s 32-foot remote production facility, NESCom Mobile Productions HD. The Z-HD5000s are equipped with a mix of studio and field production accessories and support equipment, enabling them to be set up for handheld, jib, dolly or fixed-position operation depending on the particular venue or event being covered.

Rodney Verrill, manager of events and facilities at NESCo, lauded the educational value of the Z-HD5000 and Z-HD6000’s rich controls, while praising the cameras’ fast learning curve. “The depth of the menu operations and the extensive painting settings of the cameras have enormous educational benefit, enabling students to get comfortable with the sophisticated controls they will encounter professionally,” he continued. “However, ease of use is every bit as important. While the senior students will delve deeply into the cameras’ advanced menu options, we can pre-set parameters to get our lower and mid-level students operating the cameras quickly.”

The cameras’ durability similarly earned Verrill’s respect. “With the mobile productions, the Z-HD5000s are exposed to a wide range of harsh environments, and they continue to run flawlessly,” he said. “From over 100 degree temperatures broadcasting baseball, to cold, rainy football shoots and extreme humidity changes covering indoor swimming in the winter, the cameras just keep working, day in and day out.”

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