Radial Introduces LX2 Passive Line Splitter and Attenuator

At AES 2016, Radial Engineering introduced the LX2 passive line splitter and attenuator which allows users to send a single source to two different destinations simultaneously without noise.

Radial said the LX2 has the ability to attenuate the input signal and tame hot outputs from a mixing console or mic preamp. The input of the LX2 features an XLR/TRS combo jack, which allows users to connect balanced or unbalanced line level signals to be split to two different destinations.

A premium Jensen transformer inside provides exceptional frequency response and phase coherency to ensure that the highest audio quality is maintained, while isolating the two outputs from each other to eliminate hum and buzz from ground loops.

Ground lift switches on each of the two XLR outputs help to further reduce ground loop noise. For situations where a level adjustment is required, the trim control on the LX2 allows overly hot signals to be attenuated. This allows users to drive mic preamps hard to achieve coloration, while trimming the level at the LX2 to avoid clipping the inputs of the recording interface.

The trim control is activated by a recessed “set and forget” switch. For live use or in situations where attenuation is not needed, users can disengage the switch to prevent accidental and unwanted level adjustments.

Pricing and delivery are to be announced.

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