NUGEN Audio Shows Loudness Normalization For Streaming

At AES 2016, NUGEN Audio showcased its MasterCheck software, which allows producers to create music in the new audio paradigm of loudness normalization for music streaming.

Loudness normalization and true-peak limiting techniques are now the norm for streaming services such as YouTube, Apple Music, Spotify, and DAB radio. With NUGEN Audio's MasterCheck, producers can mix audio to these new criteria and understand not only how algorithms from the major streaming platforms will affect the mix, but also how the music will sound when delivered to the consumer. In this manner, producers can assure the quality of the audio all the way down the transmission chain to the listener.

NUGEN Audio also demonstrated its ISL 2 true-peak limiter, offering the essential true-peak compliance producers need to prepare audio for streaming services. ISL prevents the distortion that often results from the codec conversions required to deliver audio via online platforms.

Also on exhibit was the company’s Halo Upmix software. Available in Avid AAX, VST, and AU formats, Halo Upmix automates the creation of a stereo-to-surround, downmix-compatible upmix with unique center-channel management and spatial density controls. 

For the first time in the U.S., the company showed Halo Upmix’s new multichannel-to-multichannel upmixing feature, delivering even greater versatility and significant timesavings in the production of surround audio. The latest version of Halo Upmix adds a brand-new set of algorithms for upmixing from multichannel audio—LCR, Quad (4.0), 5.0, 5.1, 7.0, and 7.1—to either 5.1, 7.1, or 9.1 (7.1.2). In addition, the new upgrade includes many other modifications designed to enhance user operability and finesse the interface-customization process.

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