AEA Introduces New Audio Preamps for Ribbon Microphones

Specifically designed for use with ribbon microphones, the Audio Engineering Associates’ (AEA) RPQ2 Ribbon Preamp provides two channels of high-quality, high-gain, low-noise pre-amplification.

AEA said the RPQ2, which also works with condensers and moving coil microphones, offers 81dB of gain, JFET circuitry and an input impedance of 63k ohms. The RPQ2 is AEA’s second generation preamp designed for ribbon microphones. It is now possible to plug an instrument directly into the RPQ2’s high impedance circuit with its front panel direct inputs.

RPQ2. Click to enlarge.

RPQ2. Click to enlarge.

The RPQ2 also includes a mic/line switch for balanced line inputs and outputs, as well as inserts for patching compressors or other effects between the preamp and CurveShaper EQ section. The RPQ2's CurveShapers EQ has switchable and tunable low frequency (LF) and high frequency (HF) controls for taming proximity problems and providing high-frequency extension and slope control.

RPQ2 500. Click to enlarge.

RPQ2 500. Click to enlarge.

AEA also has introduced the RPQ500 pre-amp module with JFET circuit topology. It provides dynamics, subwoofer bass and fast transients for recording. The NoLoad input impedance above 10k ohms means the RPQ won’t load down a mic and change its sound.

Its Low Energy Storage circuit design is designed to instantly recover from overloads for superior dynamic performance. The original RPQ with CurveShaper was designed to fully capture every nuance of ribbon microphones: vintage or modern, passive or phantom powered. The RPQ500 also complements moving coil and condenser mics.

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