Black Box Targets Low-latency 4K KVM Solutions

With the increase in 4K infrastructure in the broadcast sector, and following the increase in virtual studios, the underlying technology is now increasingly virtualised as well. Black Box presented current trends at this year’s IBC exhibition. The KVM and AV solution specialist’s showcased the latest in of virtual desktop infrastructure (VDI) alongside latency-free high-performance KVM solutions

One way in which Black Box is responding to the trend towards 4K is with the new 4K60 module for the tried-and-tested DKM system that is in widespread use in studios. Thanks to the modular design, only the relevant new card should be installed or added. This allows users to benefit from the latest technology without having to replace whole systems. The DKM system enables flexible and immediate matrix switching and not only permits problem-free console extension for numerous video formats, but also allows flexible cross point switching – regardless of whether one single user is to switch 287 CPUs or 50 employees are to have access to up to 238 CPUs. This means that the workstation/control room and CPU/server can be at a distance of up to 140 metres from one another (over CATx), or up to 10 kilometres apart if fibre is used. Moreover, redundant network parts that can be replaced during operation ensure high availability, making the system particularly suitable for critical usage scenarios such as live broadcasting.

An ever-growing number of CPUs used in studios and broadcasting centres are now also virtualised. In this respect, InvisaPC closes the gap between traditional KVM and virtual machines. With this compact device, it is not just possible to extend and switch DVI, USB HID, USB 2.0 and audio, but also to control virtual machines using RDP 7.1/8 Remote FX. The IP-based system only requires a low bandwidth of maximum 35 Mbit to transmit HD moving images (1080p) and performs well even at latencies up to 50 ms.

Another product that is especially designed for the demanding requirements of control rooms and master control rooms is the Agility: this multi-faceted system for digital switching, extension and distribution of video, audio, serial and USB signals can be flexibly converted from point-to-point extension to cross-point switching with as many users and CPUs as you want. Just add one further Agility receiver to the system per user in order to combine digital video, audio and USB from various sources.

In addition, the new DCX3000 offers a 30-port high-performance matrix for fast and secure switching of digital HD videos, audio and USB signals. Unlike other KVM systems, the DCX3000 transfers each individual video image pixel for pixel – without compression or latency! This makes it particularly suitable for the broadcasting environment, with its requirements for high quality graphics and enables perfect video-synchronization on different displays. The redundant power supply ensures a high level of reliability.

The new Radian video wall processor offers optimum design freedom and is therefore ideal for control rooms. Unlike with many systems, the content displayed is not tied to the limits of the monitors used, but instead can be positioned, moved around, enlarged and reduced in size completely freely on the whole monitor screen as the user wishes – in real time with no delay! Furthermore, additional programs run on the Windows-based system and can also be integrated into the display. In this way, live capture, IP streams and local media can be mixed into one application.

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