IBC Makes IP Interoperability a Reality with Dedicated Demonstration Zone

The IBC IP Interoperability Zone was presented for the first time this year through the cooperation of AIMS and the IABM.

The transition to IP is one of the biggest challenges facing broadcasters and media companies today, with fears over limited inter-working and a lack of recognised standards the most common brake on progress. IBC 22016 allocated an entire booth to demonstrating practical and proven interoperability at this year’s show.

The zone brought to life the work of the JT-NM — the Joint Task Force on Networked Media: a combined initiative of AMWA, EBU, SMPTE and VSF — and the AES on a common road map for IP interoperability.

Central to the IBC Feature Area was a live production studio, based on the technologies of the JT-NM roadmap, that Belgian broadcaster VRT has been using daily on-air all this summer as part of the LiveIP Project: a collaboration between VRT, the European Broadcasting Union (EBU) and LiveIP’s twelve technology partners.

The new initiative devoted 150 square metre area in Hall 8 to the zone. With dedicated demonstrations showcasing interoperability and the IP studio at its heart, the zone provided space for visitors to discuss the benefits and challenges of IP workflows with multiple and diverse vendors, each aligning their efforts to achieve standardisation and seamless inter-working.

The following statements have been made by IABM's CEO, Grass Valley's VP of Technology, and IBC's CEO on the IBC IP Interoperability Zone:

“Visitors will be able to see verified technical interoperability over IP from more than 30 companies and the same technology being used in a real production environment. It will be a showcase for the reality of the technology and a demonstration that the industry is converging on a common roadmap.”
—Michael Cronk, VP of Core Technology, Grass Valley
“For a number of years now the industry has needed a way forward to collaborate on IP interoperability. It was critical that the industry’s vendors came together to achieve this and at IBC we will see the fruits of the labours of the organisations behind the JT-NM and the Live IP project. We are pleased to be standing alongside AIMS to evidence the real practical progress the industry has achieved through collaboration”
— Peter White, CEO, IABM
“Even just a few months ago, the whole field of IP and interoperability was an alphabet soup of seemingly unrelated organisations. The industry has worked hard to bring a critical mass into alignment and IBC was keen to facilitate engagement and focus around this important contribution to the future of our industry. By creating a dedicated zone at this year’s IBC, we are delighted to make a space to show what has been achieved and the standards around which everyone can group. I look forward to seeing what has been achieved at the IBC IP Interoperability Zone.”
— Michael Crimp, CEO of IBC

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