New HD “Studio” Production Monitors From SmallHD With Daylight View

SmallHD is introducing new “Studio” editions of the company’s 17-inch and 24-inch 1080p production monitors, which are designed for controlled lighting environments and provide the same level of durability, high-end software capability, resolution and color accuracy as their outdoor version HDR counterparts.

"Daylight view ability is a convenient feature of our large HDR displays, but for those shooting in controlled lighting environments, the new 1703 and 2403 ‘Studio’ are perfect for the video village,” said Wes Phillips, SmallHD Co-Founder. “They feature the exact same build quality and software feature set, but don’t carry the same price tag of our extremely bright, daylight viewable HDR displays.”

The 1703 Studio and 2403 Studio models, which will be available on SmallHD.com and through SmallHD authorized resellers in June 2016, cost $2,999 and $3,499 respectively, and both share the same array of custom accessories as their HDR versions.

Designed to outlast years of abuse, every monitor housing is milled from billet aluminum and holds a 3mm thick polycarbonate screen protector that is user-replaceable. The RapidRail Shoe Mount System enables quick mounting and powering of third party accessories, making wireless setups particularly easy.

Using SmallHD’s popular “Pages” system of software presets, these monitors will adapt to every professional’s needs and speed up shoot days by providing faster access to critical tools, improving on-the-fly focus, color and lighting decisions. The new Multi-View page provides simultaneous viewing of all 3 inputs, or multiple views of the same input with a different feature and/or LUT applied to each view. Each customizable page is just a single button press away.

Built-in ColorFlow technology enables the use of custom 3D LUTs in a variety of ways: custom display calibration, real-time preview of “creative” LUTs also to be used in post-production, and the ability to imbed LUTs in the video stream for display on monitors downstream. Built-in HD Waveform provides detailed analysis on pre-LUT and post-LUT video data, further improving exposure decisions when shooting in flat looking log profiles.

Let us know what you think…

Log-in or Register for free to post comments…

You might also like...

HDR - Part 4 - Surviving Modern Colorimetry

Most people are aware that any color can be mixed from red, green and blue light, and we make color pictures out of red, green and blue images. The relationship between modern color imaging and the human visual system was…

Color and Colorimetry – Part 4

A long chain of events is needed to see a color picture on a TV set. Only by considering every link in the chain can we strengthen any weak links.

HDR - Part 3 - Grading

Almost since photography has existed, people have pursued ways of modifying the picture after it’s been shot. The “dodge” and “burn” tools in Photoshop are widely understood as ways to make things brighter or darker, but it’s probably less widely…

HDR - Part 2 - Brightness Encoding

Dealing with brightness in camera systems sounds simple. Increase the light going into the lens; increase the signal level coming out of the camera, and in turn increase the amount of light coming out of the display. In reality, it’s…

Color and Colorimetry – Part 3

The human visual system (HVS) sees color using a set of three overlapping filters, which are extremely broad. As a result, the HVS is completely incapable of performing any precise assessment of an observed spectrum.