Cinegy Demos 8K Server, Ready for 16K

Cinegy made its 8K mark at the 2016 NAB Show with the launch of the DANIEL2 codec. It can decode multiple 8K and 4K streams while performing real time compositing, color correction, scaling, and titling. The new codec is the heart of a new TV playout server introduced at the show.

Cinegy announced the launch of Air PRO Version 11 at the 2016 NAB Show, its latest real-time playout server and multi-channel broadcast automation software. In addition to support for high frame rate Ultra HD formats (50/60p), Cinegy Air PRO Version 11 has integrated HEVC stream encoding with specific NVidia graphics cards, plus the ability if required to offload HEVC and H.264 stream encoding to the NVidia GPU. The server performed 8K playout during the show.

The event marked the final release of the codec at the heart of Cinegy’s 8K playout demo, DANIEL2. DANIEL2 is a GPU-based acquisition and production codec for recording, editing, post-production, and playout. The codec resolves a problem faced when designing 4K, 8K, or even 16K systems that need to handle multiple streams in real time.

DANIEL2 is completely GPU-focused, and it eliminates legacy codec dependencies and vastly accelerates the entire production chain. “With DANIEL2 you can acquire, produce, and broadcast in 8K today using standard, off-the-shelf commodity equipment. In fact, you can produce in 16K if you want,” said Cinegy Managing Director Daniella Weigner.

Migrating to the cloud

Cinegy announced “Cinegy as a Service”, a hardware-free way of enabling users to deploy software-defined television on cloud-based virtual machines. All of Cinegy’s software technology, starting with Cinegy’s real-time playout server and broadcast automation software, Cinegy Air, will steadily migrate to cloud-based services such as Amazon Web Services (AWS) enabling prospective users to spin up, test drive, and, if they choose, deploy Cinegy technology in an HD or 4K cloud, no hardware required.

Cinegy is putting all of its APIs, manuals, and documentation out for public consumption. The company announced ‘Cinegy Open’, a new initiative to make powerful tools and useful information freely available to the public. They will be updated automatically on a regular basis via a new website.

Cinegy Open will offer a wide range of highly useful ‘Cinegy Open Tools’ designed for the IP convergence space, some under open source license, that can be downloaded for free and unconditional use without needing to register. These tools, including codec and stream analysis tools, can be used individually or across an industry to test, check, analyze, convert, or benchmark new solutions or even product rollouts.

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