Bannister Lake Launches Super Ticker Solo

Canada-based broadcast graphics provider Bannister Lake is making the proven workflow benefits of its BL Super Ticker technology available to a wider North American audience with the introduction of BL Super Ticker Solo, a full version of the software in a single-channel only configuration.  BL Super Ticker Solo reduces the hardware requirement but retains its predecessor’s powerful feature set.

The streamlined Super Ticker Solo brings the multichannel approach to call letter stations and other single-channel TV operations. While the original Super Ticker architecture combines a master server with multiple, and sometimes geographically distributed players, Super Ticker Solo localizes the creative power and data-flow flexibility within a compact, single-box solution—lowering the cost of entry for local TV stations, cable access channels and small broadcast networks. Super Ticker Solo also keeps the clean, intuitive interface to maintain ease of use, as well as limitless output and independent content zones for a high-quality, engaging and professional on-air look that plays out across many consumer devices.

“Super Ticker Solo eliminates the server overhead of Super Ticker that, while very affordable for multichannel applications, is impractical for smaller broadcast and cable stations that don’t require more than one channel,” said Georg Hentsch, president, Bannister Lake. “Super Ticker Solo reduces the footprint to a 3RU chassis that is simple to integrate. Yet, it leverages the same powerful software to creatively and reliably produce, manage and playout anything from simple news tickers and lower-third data crawls; to active, dynamic graphics and animations across multiple screen zones.”

Call letter stations can still benefit from the multi-user capability that differentiates Super Ticker from competitive systems, allowing many operators to use Super Ticker Solo across the workflow for separate graphics creation and content management functions. Production teams benefit from a similar blend of creativity and management through an ability to combine original editorial content with automated data retrieval. This operational freedom enables users to reliably automate playout of up-to-date news feeds, stock tickers, sports scores, weather conditions and more, while mixing in unique branded content customized for specific viewing audiences—such as revenue-generating sponsor messages.

Collectively, Super Ticker and Super Ticker Solo cover the gamut from the most modest broadcast operations to the largest networks, with both versions able to dynamically scale output using a time-based, automated rundown; or enable users to manually shift gears to very specifically address quickly changing program needs.

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