Spectra Logic Introduces Spectra TFinity ExaScale Tape Storage System

Spectra Logic, a specialist in deep data storage, has announced Spectra TFinity ExaScale Edition — the world’s largest tape storage system designed to address the needs of organizations with exponential data growth, such as those in media and entertainment.

Spectra Logic said the TFinity ExaScale Edition provides performance, reliability and flexibility at a lower price point, for long-term data retention with a smaller storage footprint.

It is the first tri-media tape library compatible with LTO drives and media, TS1150 tape technology and Oracle’s StorageTek T10000D, T10000C, T10000B and T10000A enterprise tape drive technology.

The technology, the company said, provides the flexibility to integrate LTO or enterprise tape technology media at the lowest price per gigabyte. Organizations now have the ability to switch vendors, if needed, and migrate existing data to their technology of choice.

TFinity addresses storage for groups that require long-term retention of massive amounts of data at a lower cost, such as media and entertainment companies with large content libraries.

“Organizations that produce massive amounts of data continually face the greatest storage challenge of our time: managing growth without complexity or cost. Tape is still the simplest, most cost effective, energy efficient storage media available,” said Matt Starr, chief technology officer, Spectra Logic.

“While the C-Suite grapples with challenges around reliability, physical size and costs related to data, Spectra TFinity ExaScale Edition addresses all of these concerns. It is truly the ‘total package’ and the top of the line tape product from Spectra Logic.”

Spectra TFinity ExaScale Edition is the world’s largest single storage system and the world’s largest storage complex, offering unsurpassed storage density and the smallest footprint that delivers a 50 percent reduction in data center floor space through a highly efficient three-dimensional library design instead of slots, and TeraPack containers in place of individual cartridges.

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