​ATEME Adds Dolby HDR Support

Encoding specialist ATEME will now support Dolby’s HDR technology, Dolby Vision. The format will be incorporated into its Titan video transcoding software for live and file applications.

Built on industry standard SMPTE ST 2084 (PQ) and the BT.2020 color space, the addition of Dolby Vision’s ST 2094 dynamic metadata produces one of the industry’s main HDR formats. Encoded by Titan in HEVC Main 10, the full Dolby Vision signal is compressed for distribution as a single layer non-backwards compatible stream, or a dual layer stream for backward compatibility supporting today’s standard rec.709 TV’s as well as the latest Dolby Vision and HDR-10 TV’s.

These stream configurations can then be selected for a variety of packaging formats to enable optical media (Blu-ray), OTT, terrestrial, cable, satellite, or IPTV deliveries. The integration of Dolby Vision into Titan will allow content providers, distributors and service providers to apply Dolby Vision technology without adding an additional step in their workflows.

ATEME’s premium quality and encoding efficiency will allow roll-out of even more Dolby Vision enabled content for the home,” said Roland Vlaicu, Dolby Vision VP. “With its dramatic imaging and artistic accuracy, Dolby Vision, delivered with ATEME’s incredibly low bitrates, can transform the consumer experience with value everyone can see.”

Michel Artières, CEO of ATEME said: “ATEME Titan with HDR support has already been largely approved, adopted and deployed by various tier 1 broadcasters and service providers all around the world. Natively bundling Dolby Vision with Titan may allow more operational flexibility and greatly simplify powerful premium HDR workflows.”

You might also like...

Data Recording: Reed-Solomon Error Correcting Codes - Part 21

The explosion in digital technology that led to Compact Discs, DVD, personal computers, digital cameras, the Internet and digital television broadcasting relies heavily on a small number of enabling technologies, one of which is the use of Reed-Solomon error correcting…

Data Recording: Burst Errors - Part 20

The first burst error correcting code was the Fire Code, which was once widely used on hard disk drives. Here we look at how it works and how it was used.

Complexity Barrier Drives Simpler Video Compression

Video encoding is running up against a complexity barrier that is raising costs and reducing scope for further improvements in quality.

“Content-Aware” Encoding Could Be Key To Cost-Effective 8K Delivery

If an 8K content service from OTT providers like Amazon, Netflix and YouTube is ever going to be successful, and that’s still a hot topic of debate, new types of compression will have to be part of the solution. T…

Bonded Cellular Spring 2020 Update

Need a live shot from inside an unmarked moving rental sedan during a thunderstorm? No problem.