Kino Flo to Show New 30/20 DMX LED System at 2016 NAB

At 2016 NAB, Kino Flo will demonstrate its new DMX Select 30 and 20 LED fixtures featuring tunable Kelvin from 2700 to 6500K, green/magenta correction and wireless DMX.

Kino Flo said from software to hardware, the Select LED lighting systems are re-shaping the future of cinema and television production with lustrous white light that doesn’t flicker or shift color temperature when dimmed.

The Select 30 and Select 20 systems can be operated wirelessly with the use of a Lumen Radio transmitter, as an alternative to DMX cables.

Kino Flo has further refined the Selects with variable green-magenta settings. Hues can be balanced to other lights on the set and tuned to match the spectral curves of professional digital cameras.

Kino Flo Select Line

Kino Flo Select Line

Select LED systems display True Match quality soft light (CRI 95), operating on universal input from 100VAC to 240VAC, or 24VDC. At 150 Watts, the electronics draw as little as 1.3A (120VAC).

The lights come with a 90-degree honeycomb louver. A 60-degree honeycomb louver is also available as an accessory. Select 30’s arrive on dealer shelves in April, and the Select 20 will ship in June.

Select LED systems will be available as a one-light kit with soft case or flight case and two-light kits with shipping cases.

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