JBL Introduces 18-Inch High Output Studio Subwoofer

Claiming that it redefines the performance benchmark for professional-grade studio subwoofers, JBL by Harman has introduced the new 18-inch JBL SUB18 High Output Studio Subwoofer that delivers high continuous output and extremely low frequency response.

Designed for music, film and video post-production mixing, JBL’s SUB18 couples power and accuracy to produce staggering in-room response below 18 Hz and 137 dB peak output. The subwoofer works with JBL’s 2269 low frequency transducer with patented Differential Drive technology.


JBL said the SUB18 answers the call for high SPL and deep low frequency performance in dance music production. In an effort to bring the “club vibe” to the control room, dance music producers and engineers resort to the use of live sound subwoofers. While in film production, the need for linear, low frequency response drives the use of multiple large subwoofers.

Specifically designed for studio use, SUB18 produces neutral low frequency response below 18 Hz, providing an accurate reference in the low frequency band and output equal to or greater than many double 18-inch subwoofers. Highest possible output and performance are obtained by powering the SUB18 with Crown iTech HD series power amplifiers.

The heart of the SUB18 is JBL’s 2269H low frequency transducer. With the 8,000-watt peak power handling capability, special technology was required for heat dissipation. The Differential Drive design incorporates two four-inch voice coils that share the thermal load, greatly reducing power compression and resulting non-linear output.

The result is sustained linear output at higher SPL than otherwise possible and true sub-bass response. The 2269H is housed in a birch plywood enclosure that is only 24-inches deep, allowing placement behind film screens.

Used in conjunction with JBL’s M2 Master Reference Monitor system, the JBL SUB18 Studio Subwoofer enables three times greater output from the system, allowing an M2 System to deliver the SPL required for large film post dubbing stages.

“The JBL SUB18 Studio Subwoofer channels our category-leading transducer and acoustic expertise to bring next generation performance to music and post production professionals,” said JBL’s Peter Chaikin. “Along with our flagship M2, the SUB18 allows music and post customers to have remarkable playback capabilities and room to room consistency in their facilities.”

The JBL M2 Master Reference Monitor System allows users to easily integrate the dynamic "big" monitoring experience into their work spaces. As small- and medium-sized rooms play an increasingly important role in content creation, accuracy and robust dynamic range are required from a speaker system with a modest footprint.

Used as a floor-standing or soffit-mount speaker system with Crown amplification, the M2 System delivers what JBL called “unrivaled performance and a jaw-dropping listening experience.”

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