Arri Introduces Ballasts for High-Speed Production

Arri has introduced the EB 12/18 HS and EB 6/9 HS AutoScan ballasts, which allow flicker-free extreme slow-motion filming with discharge lamps in the 9 kW, 12 kW and 18 kW power classes.

With digital cameras now capable of shooting at frame rates of 200 fps and beyond without any sacrifice of image quality, Arri said sophisticated new lighting tools are required for high-speed production.

Earlier in 2015, Arri announced the EB 12/18 HS, a high-speed ballast that allows 12 kW and 18 kW discharge lamps to be used at frame rates exceeding 1,000 fps. As the first ballast of its kind, the EB 12/18 HS offers a new AutoScan mode that scans the lamp and determines the frequency that will minimize light fluctuation.

Requiring little effort, this advanced feature sets the optimum lamp frequency according to each specific setup, since the behavior of discharge lamps may change with the tilt angle and the number of burn hours.

Since the introduction of Arri’s M90 M-Series lamphead, the 9 kW power class has become the new standard for high-powered daylight fixtures. Following customer requests, Arri is now offering the AutoScan mode in the 9 kW class with its new EB 6/9 HS AutoScan ballast.

Users of both the EB 12/18 HS and EB 6/9 HS AutoScan ballasts can select between automatic operations (AutoScan) and manual frequency control (Man), or combine manual frequency setting with automatic monitoring and adjustment (AutoMan).

Features such as Active Line Filter (ALF) and DMX control are also included. For ease of use, the indicators on the ballasts’ front panels display the lamp wattage, DMX channel, operation mode and the selected lamp frequency.

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