Harmonic Highlights OTT Technology With Custom Training Channels

Harmonic has found a new way of demonstrating OTT’s potential to deliver niche channels worldwide. It has established two channels about OTT itself aimed primarily at TV engineers seeking guidance on issues relating to OTT video deployment.

Launched at NAB 2015 in Las Vegas last month, the two Harmonic-centric channels are designed to highlight the company’s own products in an educational setting, both available at www.hvn.tv. The first channel, HVN-1, focuses on workflow, content creation, channel playout and distribution, video service delivery, cable edge and multiscreen issues. HVN-2 then shows off the potential of OTT for distribution of 4K content with cultural and environmental vignettes from around the world.

"We're demonstrating the new economies of creating sophisticated branded channels with automated management, delivered over the top,” said Peter Alexander, chief marketing officer at Harmonic. “We can show the industry how to dramatically reduce total cost of ownership while accelerating deployment of new services."

HVN-1 has been developed as a technical channel for video engineers wanting to know more about the technology. One of the highlights of HVN-1 content is the "Media Empire" series, which is produced in 4K in-house and features Harmonic personnel getting the HVN OTT network up and running. There is also the "VidTech Insider" technical briefing series and a variety of product spotlights that exhibit Harmonic products such as the VOS platform and NSG Exo distributed CCAP system.

HVN-2 has been created for the video enthusiast and is pitched as a 24/7 "ambient" video channel, delivering 4K footage of travel and nature imagery ranging from the scenic to the spectacular, which can be licensed for 4K testing and UHD demonstrations royalty-free. More than 70 companies including AMD, Broadcom, Dolby and Vodafone have already licensed HVN footage for such purposes.

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