4k remote camera from Bradley, JVC, Altasens collaboration

The power of NAB as a collaborative melting pot for manufacturers was demonstrated this year by a new remote controlled 4k camera jointly developed by Bradley Engineering, JVC Kenwood and Altasens. This has grown out of discussions first held at NAB 2014 and combines the companies’ respective control, sensor and lens interface products.

Based on Bradley's U3 camera head, the new unit also features the UK manufacturer's Base Station for Genlock input, TTL level control protocol and dual ST fibre connection, plus accessories including pan/tilt and three optional remote camera panels with CCU control.

The camera also features a Super 35 sensor, designed and built by Altasens, a subsidiary of JVC, which uses it in the GY-LS300 camcorder. Additionally there is a Micro Four Thirds lens interface with adapters for B4 and PL mounted lenses. If required MFT zoom server lenses can be fitted.

Commenting on the jointly developed product, David Bradley, managing director of Bradley Engineering, says, "The collaboration behind this project has been amazing, with engineers from all three companies, working together as a single team. The result is a true remote camera with outstanding picture quality and few compromises. There is no need for fibre converters and with the native option of using MFT lenses the cost of a fully working system can be kept within reasonable 4k budgets. Bradley's philosophy has always been to build cameras the way our customers want them, so we shall be listening carefully to visitors’ requirements at NAB and we plan to announce more joint developments this year."

Darren Paulson, vice president of business development and compliance for AltaSens, adds, " Bradley Engineering is the ideal company to advise us regarding key design aspects and to subsequently deliver a superb integrated solution for 4k cinema or UHD broadcast, or even for sports broadcast where slow-motion playback is required. In addition, the sensor's extensive programmability enables extremely fast frame rates in many optical formats, creating additional uses for this technology in scientific, military and consumer markets."

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