Sonifex Cancels Echo in Presenter’s Earpiece

Sonifex is showing its new Redbox RB-AEC Acoustic Echo Canceller, a DSP-based acoustic echo canceller primarily designed for the benefit of studio television and radio presenters.

When a studio presenter's microphone signal is played out through a monitor speaker in the control room, it can be picked up by the control room microphone(s) and returned to the presenter's earpiece as an undesirable echo. In circumstances where green screen video processing is taking place, the delay can be greater than 200ms.

Additionally, the dimensions, occupancy and distance between mouth and microphone can further influence the echo. The RB-AEC is used to remove the entire control room monitor speaker output from the presenter's feed by adapting to the environment in which the control room microphones are placed. Although acoustic echo cancellation is more commonly implemented in telephony systems, the Sonifex RB-AEC is designed to produce broadcast quality cancellation.

Much like during a conference call configuration between two rooms, each room has a microphone and speaker to conduct a conversation. When an occupant of one room speaks, it takes a certain length of time before it is received in the second room. Without a suitable solution this “delayed” signal can then be captured by the microphone in the second room and returned back to the first room as an echo.

In the particular example of TV production, as well as the processing/transmission delay, sound reflections from the control room monitor speaker into the control room microphone(s) often cause the studio earpiece to suffer further delay. The sound reflections in the control room vary with the contents of the room, including any personnel present, and different frequencies produce 

Sonifex will exhibit in NAB 2015 booth C2839.

Let us know what you think…

Log-in or Register for free to post comments…

You might also like...

Essential Guide:  Immersive Audio Primer – Part 1

Part one of this four-part series introduces immersive audio, the terminology used, the standards adopted, and the key principles that make it work.

What Makes a Podcast Studio Unique?

Currently, there are over 660,000 different podcasts produced throughout the world. Over 28 million episodes are available in more than 100 languages. More than 50 percent of U.S. homes listen to podcasts regularly and most listeners average seven different shows each week. For…

Using Portable Recorders to Make Recording Simple

Today, high quality audio recording may be achieved a multitude of ways, but using a low-cost portable recorder may be one of the simplest and best for non-technical users. Here are some tips.

Server-Based “At Home” Workflows Provide Efficiency For NASCAR Productions

NASCAR Productions, based in Charlotte NC, prides itself on maintaining one of the most technically advanced content creation organizations in the country. It’s responsible for providing content, graphics and other show elements to broadcasters (mainly Fox and NBC), as w…

Vintage vs. New: Which Pro Audio Gear is Better?

Vintage pro audio gear has a certain panache that almost guarantees its consistently high value. But is it functionally better than new gear? It can be if time and money is poured into high maintenance and a fanatical level of…