Wheatstone Adds @#!$ Delay to WheatNet-IP Audio Network

Wheatstone has announced a partnership with Eventide, whereby Eventide’s profanity delay technology will be integrated into Wheatstone’s WheatNet-IP audio network. Eventide now joins more than 55 WheatNet-IP technology vendors and brand partners, ranging from automation playout to transmission products.

Eventide’s new BD600W delay unit now comes with WheatNet-IP networking built-in for easy and seamless integration of profanity delay into the WheatNet-IP audio and control network. This helps eliminate one more network box in the studio chain.

Wheatstone’s WheatNet-IP audio network is an end-to-end broadcast studio system comprising audio consoles, routing, mixing, processing, silence detection, logic control and seamless integration with third-party vendors. It is the first AES67 compatible audio network for radio and television, and the only distributed network to include audio resources such as mixing and processing at IP nodes or access points in the network.

Eventide Chairman Richard Factor said that the audio network is the “lifeblood of today’s broadcast studio, and now with the addition of this WheatNet-IP card into our profanity delay unit, we can add more capability to the network.”

With 80 seconds of profanity protection, micro-precision delay, unmatched audio performance, and now, seamless network integration, the BD600W combines both extended remote control and audio over Wheatstone’s WheatNet-IP broadcast network.

In 1977, Eventide invented the profanity delay, replacing costly analog tape-based solutions with a seven-second rack mounted digital delay using a patented “catch-up” system. Today, Eventide broadcast delays are found in more stations than that of all of its competitors combined. 

Wheatstone will exhibit in NAB 2015 booth C755.

Eventide will exhibit in NAB 2015 booth C2848.

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