DVEO to Demo Miniature (1.66 Inches) Professional 1080p Camera at NAB

DVEO will demonstrate a broadcast standard version of their miniature 1080p HD camera, called the GNAT 1080p 60, which features 29.97/59.94 fps capture in addition to 30/60 fps operation.

The  DEVO GNAT 1080p 60 (starting at under $500) is a tiny 1080p 60 fps or 59.94 fps camera with HD-SDI or full 3 Gbps output. The 2.1 megapixel CMOS camera is just 1.66 x 1.14 x 1.14 inches (42.1 x 29 x 29 millimeters) and weighs approximately 1.41 ounces (40 grams).

The GNAT features a built-in on-screen display joystick and a 1/3-inch progressive scan CMOS sensor. The DSP chip based camera is available in cased or board versions. All versions of the camera output NTSC or PAL video. The cased version ships with a tripod adapter, universal power supply, and control cable.

DVEO, the broadcast division of Computer Modules, Inc., designs and manufactures digital video and high definition television products to the top television broadcast companies throughout the world.

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