Essential Guide: Delivering Timing For Live Cloud Productions

January 18th 2023 - 09:30 AM
Tony Orme, Editor, The Broadcast Bridge

IP is an enabling technology, not just another method of transporting media signals. Consequently, it is giving broadcasters the opportunity to reconsider how we build live television workflows and infrastructures.

One of the key aspects of this is to look at television from the point of view of the audience so that we can improve the immersive experience. And that means reviewing the historical baggage of television so we can find ways of simplifying infrastructures to deliver a much-improved viewing experience.

For example, nanosecond timing was needed to facilitate color subcarrier chroma modulation and provide color television while at the same time delivering backwards compatibility with existing monochrome television viewers. But do we still need to make provision for color subcarriers?

Also, if we consider our human response times to operational latency then we suddenly have the freedom to look at how we approach control. This is particularly important as we move to IP, un-managed networks, cloud, and datacenter real-time operation.

This Essential Guide has been written for technologists, broadcast engineers, their managers, and anybody looking to leverage the power of IP using unmanaged networks, the internet, cloud, and datacenter processing.

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