Riedel Unveils Bolero 2.4 GHz

Celebrating the fifth anniversary of the state-of-the-art wireless intercom system Bolero, Riedel Communications has unveiled Bolero 2.4 GHz.

Instead of Bolero’s standard DECT band, this new iteration operates on the 2.4 GHz band, allowing customers in regions where DECT carrier frequencies are either limited or unavailable — such as China, India, and South Korea — to profit from Bolero’s versatility, reliability, and unrivalled feature set in navigating difficult RF environments.

Bolero 2.4 GHz uses a practically identical feature set and offers the same three network modes as the DECT version: Integrated, Standalone Link, and Standalone 2110 (AES67). The 2.4 GHz band limits use to eight beltpacks per antenna instead of 10, but allows for connectivity anywhere, with just one “Global” region for 2.4 GHz antennas. The 2.4 GHz iteration also comes with Bolero’s high-clarity voice codec and its unrivalled multipath tolerant receiver (ADR) technology adapted to 2.4 GHz, allowing the system to continuously adapt to changing RF reflection environments. With near-field communication (NFC) touch-and-go beltpack registration; an ergonomic, robust beltpack design; and three modes as beltpack, desktop key panel, or walkie-talkie, Bolero 2.4 GHz is just as easy to use, sleek, and versatile.

While Bolero 2.4 GHz was developed primarily for Riedel’s international customers, regions in the United States where the number of DECT carrier frequencies are limited can benefit from a hybrid 2.4 GHz and DECT system, enabling the creation of massive installations with unprecedented number of users in a limited space.

You might also like...

Electricity: Part 8 - Electric OB Vans

We are told that in the future all cars will be electrically powered. It is therefore quite natural that a broadcaster should consider whether outside broadcast vehicles might follow suit.

Electricity: Part 7 - Lithium Batteries

Lithium batteries are all the rage on account of their low weight and high capacity. But how good are they really?

Flexible Contribution Over IP - Part 2

Delivering determinant latency is more important than fighting variable latency, even if it is small. In this article, we look at how codec design and JPEG-XS can scale to make the best use of network bandwidth while keeping latency predictable.

Planning Prevents Panic

The more digital TV technology advances, the more the fundamental elements of TV remain the same.

Electricity: Part 6 - Introducing Batteries

One cannot get very far with electricity without the topic of batteries arising. Broadcasters in particular have become heavily dependent on batteries to power portable equipment such as cameras and lights.