Grass Valley Launches Playout Xpress

Grass Valley continues to help customers deliver more compelling content at low-cost entry points with the latest addition to its portfolio, Playout Xpress.

This new solution enables playout customers to adapt to rapidly changing audience trends in a quick and easy way through a system that is powerful enough to handle the most demanding channel requirements. With Playout Xpress, broadcasters and rights holders can quickly originate more content, across more pop-up feeds and social media, without the overhead of complex and lengthy installation projects. GV Playout Xpress was built to be deployable, by the customer, within a day.

Playout Xpress, the latest addition to Grass Valley’s playout product portfolio, is a simple, onsite, pre-commissioned system that allows the end user to define their specific requirements. It supports up to four channels of playout. With a powerful and reliable feature set, the new solution provides customers with a resilient automation system that can cope with the complex demands of playout at a competitive entry point. A feature-rich integrated playout system, Playout Xpress can help lead to more business flexibility and faster revenue generation by reducing the complexities of deployment projects.

Karl Mehring, senior commercial director, playout for Grass Valley, commented, “In today's dynamically shifting media market, customers need to engage with global audiences that can no longer be reached through one or two platforms. Playout is crucial to enabling customers to spin services up and down quickly in the most cost efficient way possible. Our portfolio of playout solutions is designed to support everything from high density, enterprise-level applications to cloud-native systems that meet the needs of temporary pop up channels, and we are excited to launch Playout Xpress to further expand our offering."

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