ZEISS Adds Four New Focal Lengths To Supreme Prime Radiance Family

The 18 and 135 millimeter focal lengths add telephoto and wide-angle specialties to the seven focal lengths available to date. The new 40 and 65 millimeter lenses enhance the standard range, meaning that the ZEISS Supreme Prime Radiance family, as a self-contained series, now covers all possible applications for high-end film production.

With a maximum aperture of T1.5, all eleven focal lengths stand out for their high speed and allow the finest nuances of light to be perceived, even in low-light conditions.

ZEISS Supreme Prime Radiance lenses offer a distinctive look with consistent flares that can be controlled at all times and used without compromise. The ZEISS T* blue coating was developed especially for this series to allow users to create this look across all focal lengths – without having to sacrifice contrast or light transmission. 

“The ZEISS Supreme Prime Radiance lenses began as a variant and complement to our existing ZEISS Supreme Prime lenses and have now evolved into a high-end cine set in their own right,” explains Christophe Casenave, responsible for the cine portfolio at ZEISS, adding, “their sophisticated, artistic design has been so well received by the cine community that we are proud to expand the line with four new lenses, offering a comprehensive set of focal lengths for all kinds of artistic demands in cine productions.” These include everything from blockbusters to auteur films to the new era of cinematic episodic television produced by streaming providers.

Like the ZEISS Supreme Prime lenses, the ZEISS Supreme Prime Radiance lenses offer all the attributes of a state-of-the-art cine lens – with an image circle diameter of 46.3 millimeters, they cover current large-format cine sensors and are compatible with current camera models such as the Sony Venice, the ARRI Alexa LF and Mini LF, or the RED Monstro. Incorporating a uniform front diameter of 95 millimeters and consistently positioned focus and aperture rings, they feature smooth and reliable focusing, simplifying the task of changing lenses on set. The rugged lenses’ average weight is about 1,600 grams (3.5 lbs).

Equipped with the ZEISS eXtended Data metadata technology, the lenses provide frame-by-frame data on lens vignetting and distortion in addition to the standard metadata provided by Cooke’s /i technology protocol. This simplifies and speeds up workflows, particularly for VFX and virtual production.

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